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What is Diversity in the Workplace?

Recently, throughout series of nationwide protests regarding racial inequality and the #BlackLivesMatter movementrenewed attention has been focused on diversity and inclusion. While this started as a social movement, it has also brought many to reassess what diversity looks like in the workplace and take a critical eye to inclusion efforts, both in the workplace and beyond. This post marks the start of an ongoing series addressing diversity, inclusion, overcoming unconscious bias in the workplace, and more. 

Di·ver·si·ty: 



  1. The state or fact of being diverse; difference; unlikeness 

  2. Variety; multiformity 


While diversity is the variety that makeup a workforce, inclusion encompasses how each employee is able to participate and thrive within an organization. Educating oneself on the history and importance of diversity and providing resources for employees to do the same can improve an organization 

According to a Glassdoor survey, 67% of job seekers said a diverse workforce is important when considering job offers and 57% of employees think their companies should be more diverse.  

Diversity of all kinds can benefit an organization. While it is a critical component of the employer brand, it can also greatly expand the innovation of each team and provide necessary insight into a diverse clientele. Company diversity efforts that go beyond the surface can greatly evolve a company by bringing new perspectives and experiences to the table. 

In the midst of global protests, social unrest and the #BlackLivesMatter movement, racial diversity and inequality has become a major focal point of the political, social and professional spheres. Including those of all different races within an organization can provide valuable insight, education, life experiences and points of view. Hiring those of different races and ethnic backgrounds across all levels and teams can help to promote a more welcoming and open company culture and a more innovative workforce. 

In addition to racial diversity, there are more forms of diversity to keep in mind as you continue to build out your workforce. These include, but are not limited to: 

  • Age: Hiring employees of varying generations, from Gen Z, millennials, Gen X, and baby boomers, across teams and levels, will allow for varying perspectives that make up a more robust team.  

  • CulturePeople of different cultural backgrounds working together can provide greater insight into how different people may receive your product, service or branding.  

  • Disabilities: Consider if there are ways to make your office space more conducive to those with physical limitations and consider what accommodations you may be able to provide for those with additional mental or emotional needs.  

  • EducationWhile some roles require specific certifications and degrees, including those of different educational backgrounds within an organization provides varying points of views and experiences that can add value to a team 

  • Gender: It is important to provide equal opportunity to all genders, including male, femalecisgender, transgender and others. 

  • Geographic location: If limiting your hires to one geographic region, you may be limiting your talent poolConsider ways in which you can provide opportunity to those in various locations. 

  • Marital and parental status: There are many variations to what a family looks like, and the different experiences and priorities held by employees of various family structures is important to pay attention to 

  • Military background: Those with military or other government service experience often hold unique insights and experiences that make them a valuable team member and strong leader. 


Diversity in the workplace is about bringing together a variety of voices and different perspectives to create something impactful.  

If you’re looking to build a diverse team, let us help you.  Get connected here 

 

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